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Personal Health Care Spending Continues to Soar in the U.S.


HealthDay News
Updated: Dec 27th 2016

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TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 1996 to 2013 there were considerable increases in personal health care spending in the United States, with the highest amounts for diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and low back and neck pain, according to a study published in the Dec. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Joseph L. Dieleman, Ph.D., from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in Seattle, and colleagues estimated U.S. spending on personal health care and public health using data from government budgets, insurance claims, facility surveys, household surveys, and official U.S. records from 1996 to 2013. A total of 183 data sources were used to estimate spending for 155 conditions.

The researchers found that $30.1 trillion of personal health care spending was disaggregated by 155 conditions, age and sex group, and type of care from 1996 to 2013. Diabetes had the highest health care spending in 2013, with an estimated $101.4 billion in spending, including 57.6 and 23.5 percent spent on pharmaceuticals and ambulatory care, respectively. The second- and third-highest amount of health care spending was on ischemic heart disease and low back and neck pain, with estimated health care spending of $88.1 and $87.6 billion, respectively. From 1996 to 2013, personal health care spending increased for 143 of 155 conditions; over the study period, spending on low back and neck pain and diabetes increased the most.

"This information may have implications for efforts to control U.S. health care spending," the authors write.

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